Own grown players in the Premiership falls below a third for the first time.

JimmyG2

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The number of Home grown players in the Premiership has fallen to below a third for the first time.
Gareth is worried and should clubs including ours be concerned.

We have chosen to go another way with emphasis on our own and youth but should the quota be raised from 8 in the squads to say 10 or even 12. We still buy in talent but not at the level of our rivals.

The temptation for Managers to buy in established 'stars' from abroad is tempting if they have the money to buy them and the perennial need for instant success.

The impact of foreign stars has been important to raise the standard for everyone but does it make the playing field even more uneven and has it gone too far.

Several of our own young players have recently gone abroad to gain experience. Is this a good thing or is it simply the result of lack of opportunities at home?

The number of foreign managers and owners clearly influences this but the trend is clearly of concern.

Brexit may change all this of course.


Guardian article:
https://www.theguardian.com/football/2018/sep/05/english-premier-league-gareth-southgate.

Click on and 'open link'
 

Dougal

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#2
Shouldn’t be a problem. The strength of the England team in the World Cup was having players who had to fight their way up through spells at lower league clubs. Builds character.

It’s also why Ireland are World Champions with a squad full of Championship players.
 

worcestersauce

"I'm no optimist I'm just a prisoner of hope
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#3
It asks if the young British players that have gone abroad is because of lack of opportunity or is it a good thing but it could be both couldn't it?
 

DCSPUR

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#4
RLG played one game for Chelsea the season he signed a new $60k a week contract with no release clause and no "Thiago" clause (ie lower release if he plays less than x games for Barca). Seems clear his dad would like him to be working under MP but the earlier decision blocked that.
Players need to weigh up all aspects of contracts before signing.
 

whitesocks

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#5
It asks if the young British players that have gone abroad is because of lack of opportunity or is it a good thing but it could be both couldn't it?
It could be a good thing, but if they stay too long, too young, the badly implemented home quota rule will make their life harder when they return.
 

greywizard2020

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#6
I believe the issue is a mixture of both players not getting chances & also having wedge-loads of cash thrown at them from a very early age, which gives them licence to not bother.

Its a contemporary issue of managers being under-pressure when not even having played 10 x games, which means they are looking for players that can save them right away. Hard-workers in the academy aren't being given a sniff because of the immense pressure on achieving success straightaway.

The flip side is there are players who are receiving huge amount of money & all the trappings of success without being anywhere near the 1st team. The incentive to succeed disappears because you have players who had so much handed to them without having to succeed. Unless players ask for it, then they aren't going to go to the lower leagues & battle. BT Sport did a great documentary around Christmas/New Year, which highlights the dual problems that blight academy players.

The FA need to give greater carte blanche to L1 & L2 teams to be able to field at least 8 x UK-born U21 loanees in their matchday squad. Maybe, a partnership can be put in place between higher & lower division clubs that facilitates a contingent of players going in to get experience. At least half the wages to be covered by the higher club, so its not a huge financial burden & do away with the idea of a loan fee.

Simply put these prospects need minutes in a matchday 1st team to develop their skillset & build their mental strength in difficult places.
 
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eViL

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#7
Stop making them so fucking expensive to promote home grown from the lower Leagues then..
 

Japhet

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#10
I believe the issue is a mixture of both players not getting chances & also having wedge-loads of cash thrown at them from a very early age, which gives them licence to not bother.

Its a contemporary issue of managers being under-pressure when not even having played 10 x games, which means they are looking for players that can save them right away. Hard-workers in the academy aren't being given a sniff because of the immense pressure on achieving success straightaway.

The flip side is there are players who are receiving huge amount of money & all the trappings of success without being anywhere near the 1st team. The incentive to succeed disappears because you have players who had so much handed to them without having to succeed. Unless players ask for it, then they aren't going to go to the lower leagues & battle. BT Sport did a great documentary around Christmas/New Year, which highlights the dual problems that blight academy players.

The FA need to give greater carte blanche to L1 & L2 teams to be able to field at least 8 x UK-born U21 loanees in their matchday squad. Maybe, a partnership can be put in place between higher & lower division clubs that facilitates a contingent of players going in to get experience. At least half the wages to be covered by the higher club, so its not a huge financial burden & do away with the idea of a loan fee.

Simply put these prospects need minutes in a matchday 1st team to develop their skillset & build their mental strength in difficult places.

IMO the loan system needs sorting out. When rich clubs can stockpile talented young players and ship them out all over the place it's not helping those players to break through. If they do succeed the chances are they'll be sold abroad. Jaydon Sancho is a prime example. Home grown players in a few top clubs have a certain whiff of tokenism about them.
 

TheHoddleWaddle

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#11
Little things throughout the league don't help. Like spurs having 3 keepers, none of which are from local stock. Can't see the sense in that personally, especially when it hampers your own quotas.

The thing is, the premier league is an international league. Followed for it's entertainment value. I'd wager a large proportion of tv rights, shirt sales etc are all abroad. So in terms of the fan base, I'd argue that perhaps each side is 'representative' of its following.

I'd love to see more home.grown players as I follow the English national side. But I get why lots of spurs supporters couldn't care less.
 

TheHoddleWaddle

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#12
IMO the loan system needs sorting out. When rich clubs can stockpile talented young players and ship them out all over the place it's not helping those players to break through. If they do succeed the chances are they'll be sold abroad. Jaydon Sancho is a prime example. Home grown players in a few top clubs have a certain whiff of tokenism about them.
Needs a general.shift in how young players think too. Signing for a large club, especially the likes of City etc are going to seriously hamper your chances of ever making it in the professional game. Certainly at the top level. Its such short term.thinking following the money. Sure, get a contract for 3 years, never play, then your desirability as a player is going to be much lower. Whereas, making your name like Dele did, playing week in week out and showcasing your talent is more likely to get you signed up to a 'bigger team' in the long run. All that said, you'd still make.a.great living out of playing championship/ div 1 football. Certainly much more longevity to a career than 3 years at a big one to then fall off a footballing cliff? I'm making assumptions, but there's numerous examples of young highly rated players falling into oblivion having signed for big teams.
 
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