UPDATE: Former Spurs starlet sues club for £7m after heart attack ends his career

boy-C

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May 13, 2004
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#22
I feel sorry for the lad I truly do and hope he gets looked after but not everything in life is predictable and spurs were giving him an opportunity to do what he dreamed to do it is not spurs fault this unfortunate tragedy happened, sometimes shit happens and you have to accept it and deal with it, life is full of risks just getting out of bed can cause serious injury if you are unlucky. I just wish people would stop trying to find blame for every thing that goes wrong in life especially when the people you are blaming are trying to help you to succeed in life. shit has happened to me for no reason, sometimes you have to accept you are just unlucky and be great full for what you had and for what you still have the
 

davidmatzdorf

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Jun 7, 2004
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#23
Wonder if clubs will ask players to sign a waiver to ensure liability is limited.
I don't think they would.

1. It would put off potential youth players and cause distrust. They'd sign for another club instead.

2. I don't think such a waiver would be legally binding, at least not for players under 18.

3. It would create a hailstorm of dreadful publicity.

So no. Not a chance.
 

Geyzer Soze

Fearlessly the idiot faced the crowd
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Aug 16, 2010
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#24
Friend of mine went to the toilet in the middle of the night one night last August. Dropped dead of a heart attack on the way. He was 40. He left a wife & 2 daughters, 10 & 7.

Turns out he had an undiagnosed heart condition

Must there be someone to blame? Should the family be seeking to sue his GP? His work? Who?
 

Khilari

Plumber. Sort of.
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Jun 19, 2008
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2,776
#25
I missed this when it happened, though I wasn't a cardiologist back then. This is tragic. But it's not quite black and white as it appears. I've had the pleasure of meeting a couple of Spurs players who have undergone screening for similar reasons - an abnormal ECG is usually the reason. But, whilst it is easy to say to a potential player "there's something funny about your heart tracing, it's best you don't play professional football ever" - that would be career-destroying and life-changing without necessarily strong evidence to support it.

For the record, Italy has a phenomenal athlete screening program that the UK should (and does in the medical community) look up to.

Whilst the doctor concerned may well have made errors (and if so, should be pulled up on these), it seems as pointed out above that further assessments may have been missed by Spurs.

I feel most for the young man, who's life has basically been ruined after this horrible event.
 

balalasaurus

big black member
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Dec 29, 2012
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Thread starter #26
As much this is a sad story, I find it hard to see how proceedings will move against the club specifically. Now I'm not saying I'm party to the operations of the club but I'd like to think that in all cases we do what it takes to cover ourselves legally and financially.

If there was a case of negligence then surely it can only be on the part of the doctor who ran the tests in the first place no? I mean as far as the club's responsibility goes, it's to make sure that a potential player passes all the necessary tests to play for us. Actually administering those tests is beyond the club's control even if we assume that the club did in fact source the most capable people available for the job.

Again tragic story, but I really don't think there's much the club is responsible for.
 

ginola007

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Aug 31, 2012
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#27
As much this is a sad story, I find it hard to see how proceedings will move against the club specifically. Now I'm not saying I'm party to the operations of the club but I'd like to think that in all cases we do what it takes to cover ourselves legally and financially.

If there was a case of negligence then surely it can only be on the part of the doctor who ran the tests in the first place no? I mean as far as the club's responsibility goes, it's to make sure that a potential player passes all the necessary tests to play for us. Actually administering those tests is beyond the club's control even if we assume that the club did in fact source the most capable people available for the job.

Again tragic story, but I really don't think there's much the club is responsible for.
Medicine is not an exact science, and never will be. Unless there is a clear indication of neglect, it seems unfair to hold the club responsible. Moreover, there are players who are unwilling to accept a certain medical verdict, such as a promising Irish youngster (sorry I've forgotten his name) we had in our book, but went to West Ham after our medical team told him he could not make it as a pro because of injury concern.
 

davidmatzdorf

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#29
So presumably the doctor's medical malpractice insurance will pay.
You're prejudging the result. I think the medical malpractice insurers will take over the conduct of the lawsuit on behalf of the doctors (it seems there are two in the frame, judging by the OS' short statement), each defending its own client.

If one or both of the doctors are found to have been negligent, then their insurers will have to pay up. If not, then it will just cost insurers whatever the defence cost them and the doctors will walk away, reputation somewhat undermined but medical licences intact.
 
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